RECORDING DISCUSSIONS

DUET Recently published
Paperback,
314 Pages 

Price: $12.50
Prints in 3-5 business days
Duet, the autobiography of famous British duettists, Webster Booth and Anne
Ziegler, was originally published by Stanley Paul in 1951. Sixty-five years
later I have digitised the book and made it available as a paperback, epub and
pdf book. My sincere thanks to John Marwood who proofread the book most
painstakingly for me. Webster and Anne tell the exciting story of their rise to
fame, and their sensational romance. After Webster’s divorce from Paddy Prior,
his second wife, he and Anne married and became the most popular duettists of
their day, earning them the deserved title of Sweethearts of Song.



The book is also available as an ebook at My Duettist’s Bookstore
RECORDING DISCUSSIONS
Top of Form

Anne Ziegler and Webster Booth were versatile singers so it is difficult to
name just one duet or solo as an all-time favourite. Webster recorded far more
solo recordings than he did duets with Anne, although he is largely remembered
today because of the duets.

In Webster’s case there are light songs with British Dance Bands led by
Jack Hylton, Carroll Gibbons, Debroy Somers, Ray Noble, as the anonymous “with
vocal refrain” with the accordion band of Carlos Santana (one of the many
pseudonyms adopted by the equally versatile musician, Harry Bidgood), and the
popular Fred Hartley’s Quintet or Sextet. He also sang in medleys, sometimes on
his own or with singers like Janet Lind, Garda Hall, Magda Neeld, Marjorie
Stedeford, Stuart Robertson, Sam Costa, Olive Groves, and Nora Savage.

As his singing career progressed he began recording more serious songs,
and arias from opera and oratorio. In operatic ensembles he was partnered with
singers like Norman Walker, Dennis Noble, Joan Hammond, Joan Cross, Noel Eadie,
Nancy Evans, Arnold Matters and Edith Coates. Conductors of these recordings
included Warwick Braithwaite, Laurance Collingwood and Malcolm Sargent, and
accompanists included Gerald Moore, Herbert Dawson (organ), and John Cockerill
(harp).

The duets recordings were generally of musical comedy, operetta and
popular songs of the day arranged as duets such as Dearest
of all
 by Vernon Latham Sharp and Too
tired to sleep
 by Alan Murray. There were also duet
arrangements of instrumental pieces by Chopin and Liszt, and a charming duet of
Mendelssohn’s lied “On Wings of Song”.

Which ones are my favourites ? Why does the God of Israel sleep? from
the oratorio, Samson by Handel is one of my favourites. It
illustrates Webster’s amazing vocal technique and dramatic power. He was a
prolific recording solo artist and a highly regarded oratorio soloist.

 

Excerpt from an Australian newspaper – March 11 1950

 


Shortly after Webster began recording for HMV in 1929, critics in Gramophone magazine
praised his voice but thought he should be singing songs more worthy of
it. In April 1937, a critic wrote, “Gradually Webster Booth is finding his
rightful place as a member of the solo quartet in our concert halls, when the
choral masterpieces are given. Only the other day a severe critic of
English singing singled out Mr Booth as one of the very few elect.

Most people remember Webster Booth  for the romantic duets he sang
with Anne Ziegler on record, stage, screen and radio but several
derogatory comments have been made about his duet partnership with Anne, most
people claiming that he would be better regarded as a serious singer today had
he not formed the Variety Act with Anne in 1940.  Anne was the first to
admit that she had a “ten-a-penny” soprano voice while his voice was in a
different category from hers. She was aware that many people thought she had
“brought.him down”.

They went into variety because it paid far better than more serious
forms of entertainment and they had expensive family financial commitments.
Within a very short time they became very popular with those who enjoyed
hearing operetta and musical comedy duets sung by a very handsome and charming
couple. Anne and Webster were a romantic pair and their variety act took the
public’s mind off the daily grind of war for an hour or two. While Anne’s voice
might not have been in the same class as Webster’s, one cannot deny that they
sang the duets musically and their voices complemented one another. 

Webster did not drop his oratorio singing and it was while he and Anne were
singing in Variety and Harold Fielding concerts that he made some of his finest
serious oratorio recordings. 
He was one of Sir Malcolm Sargent’s favourite tenors and was chosen by
Sir Malcolm to sing at his sixtieth birthday celebration concert in 1955.

Webster was a lyric tenor with excellent diction and a wide vocal range.
Although his voice was light it filled the Albert Hall, a hall with a
notoriously difficult acoustic for singers. He had a pleasing baritonal quality
in the lower range of his voice and, in later years, fulfilled a long-held
ambition to sing the baritone solos in a performance of Elijah in Knysna, South
Africa.

If one listens to his recordings of Mozart operatic arias and the
operatic duets with baritone, Dennis Noble  in Puccini’s La
Bohème 
and Rossini’s The Barber of Seville, and
the extracts from Bizet’s Carmen with Dennis Noble, Nancy
Evans, Noel Eadie and the Sadlers Wells chorus, he more than held his own among
the foremost operatic singers of the day. Perhaps he would not have managed
heavier operatic roles on stage but he had a voice ideal for Mozart, Rossini,
Gounod, and Handel.

At that time it was the convention to record everything in English on
the HMV plum label, but I have a recording of him singing in an Italian which
sounds quite acceptable to me, so I don’t think singing in a foreign language
would have presented a problem to him. He was also a highly competent musician,
so he would have had no difficulty learning an operatic role. As a young man he
was keen to sing in opera, but opera did not pay as well as lighter forms of
entertainment. In 1926 Sir Malcolm Sargent told him that if he did not have a
private income he should leave opera alone. Webster’s older sister, Doris
(known as Nellie) was very disappointed that he did not make a career in opera.

I have an LP called Famous British Tenors in my
collection. Webster sings the rather obscure aria, O,
Vision Entrancing
 
from Esmeralda by Goring
Thomas, while his peers are heard in more popular arias. Despite this he still
sounds very much better than most of those who are spoken off in hallowed
tones, while Webster is dismissed as a light-weight, a mere romantic duettist!

Webster managed to set the appropriate mood for each song he sang,
whether it was a light ballad or a profound aria. One only has to
contrast Total Eclipse from Handel’s Samson with
Percy French’s Phil the Fluter’s Ball to see a
complete change of mood. He certainly was a versatile singer, but far from
being “A jack of all trades, master of none,” I suggest that he was a master in
command of every song he sang.

 


Once Anne and Webster’s
recording contract with HMV was cancelled in 1951 they made a few recordings
for Decca and gradually their 78s were deleted from the record
catalogues. 

But in the late
fifties several long playing records were issued, comprising their popular duet
recordings. 
Love Duets from Theatreland was issued by EMI in the UK, while, in South Africa, a similar
record, entitled 
Sweethearts of Song was issued, with sleeve notes by their friend, Leslie Green.

 

In 1959 they made an LP of their popular duets. The words had been
translated into Afrikaans and, instead of the orchestral accompaniment on the
78s, there was organ and piano accompaniment by Jack Dowle and John Massey.
This record was entitled 
Net Maar ‘n Roos (Only a Rose).


In 1963 they
made 
Nursery School Sing-Along (No 2). This time Heinz Alexander was the accompanist and
the Nazareth House Children’s Chorus was conducted by my piano teacher, Sylvia
Sullivan. Webster thought highly of Mrs Sullivan’s conducting and insisted that
she conducted all the songs for the record.

 

A recording of
Webster’s was included in 
Famous British Tenors issued in 1972.  Webster sings the rather obscure aria, O,
Vision Entrancing
 
from Esmeralda by Goring
Thomas, while his peers are heard in more popular arias. He was rather put
out about this as he thought the powers-that-be might have chosen a more
popular aria for his recording. Perhaps recording techniques had not been very
advanced for some of the other tenors on the recording sound rather thin.
Webster’s recording sounds very much better than most of the other
recordings by those who are spoken off in hallowed tones, while Webster is so
often dismissed as a light-weight, a mere romantic duettist!




Meanwhile, a solo recording called simply Webster Booth was issued by Rococo, Canada in
the late sixties. All the recordings had been taken from the collection of
Scott Sheldon. Webster played me this record when I visited the Booth home in
Knysna in 1973 and I was delighted to hear some songs I had not heard
before. 


He told me that EMI
would never issue an LP of his more serious work until he was dead, but in
1977, just such a recording was issued. He was very pleased that he was alive
to see it, but was rather put out because it was recommended that the record
should be filed under the historical section of the catalogue!

 

The Booths returned to England in 1978 and EMI issued two duet LPs in the late seventies and early
eighties. 
Sweethearts in Song included the same recordings as those from the late fifties, while
the other, 
Music for Romance was a more interesting collection of their lesser-known
duets.
 

Webster Booth died on Anne Ziegler’s birthday, 21 June 1984 in Penrhyn Bay, North Wales. A year or so later EMI issued The Golden Age of Webster Booth. 

 

 At about the same time the LP entitled The Golden Age of Ballads and Parlour
Songs
, featuring Webster and some of his contemporaries was issued. Webster
sang Tosti’s 
Parted on this LP.

 

 He was also featured in the Irving Berlin Centenary Celebration  by the  great British dance bands, singing two songs in a Waltz Medley, with Ray Noble conducting the New Mayfair Orchestra.

 

By 1989 Webster’s earlier recordings were coming out of their fifty-year copyright and solo and duet CD
compilations were issued by EMI and independent companies during the nineties.
Because these recordings were out of copyright, Anne did not receive any royalties from their sale.


Jeannie C
2010

Rehearsing for a broadcast with Sydney Jerome (1938)

AZ/WB RECORDINGS ON YOUTUBE

Most of the videos featuring Anne Ziegler and Webster Booth have been
uploaded by me. My channel is at http://www.youtube.com/duettists

I was interested to see the BBC4 archive on Desert Island Discs. Webster Booth was a
castaway on 3 April 1953. Unfortunately this episode is not yet available
as a podcast, but I am hoping that it might be added some time. Webster’s
choice of discs were, as follows:

 

Jean Sibelius: Finlandia, Philharmonia Orchestra

Irving Berlin: You Can’t Get A Man With A Gun (Annie
get your gun), Ethel Merman

Franz Liszt: Liebesträum
No. 3 in A flat major
: vocal version sung by Tito Schipa

 Charles N. Daniels: Chloe (Song of the Swamp):Spike Jones and His City Slickers

Frances Allitsen: The Lute Player, Harold Williams (baritone)


Gilbert and Sullivan: The Yeoman of the Guard, Royal Liverpool Philharmonic
Orchestra Conductor: Malcolm Sargent

 George Frederic Handel: Ombra mai fu (Largo) (from Xerxes): Kathleen Ferrier (contralto)London Symphony Orchestra Conductor: Malcolm Sargent

George Frederic Handel: Comfort ye my people (from Messiah) Webster Booth,
London Philharmonic Orchestra


Luxury item: ivory pig


The Tito Schipa recording of Liebestraum was
the same arrangement as Webster himself had recorded. 


Webster considered Australian baritone, Harold Williams to
be one of the finest singers of the role of Elijah in
Mendelssohn’s oratorio of the same name.

 

     Kathleen Ferrier lived opposite the Booths in Frognal, Hampstead. Webster and Anne often visited her when she was
confined to her bed due to illness. Webster had admired her voice greatly and had been looking forward to singing a Messiah with her as
contralto soloist. Sadly she had to cancel this engagement due to ill health and she died less than seven months after this broadcast, on 8 October 1953. 

 


At that time the copyright on Gilbert’s words was still in place, so it would only have been possible to play the overture of The
Yeomen of the Guard
.

  

 The BBC website lists the soloist in Comfort ye/Ev’ry Valley as Walter Booth rather than Webster Booth!

  

   A number of the recordings Webster chose were conducted by Sir Malcolm Sargent. Sargent was Webster’s champion and chose him for many oratorio performances. In 1955, on the occasion of Sir Malcolm’s sixtieth birthday, he personally requested that Webster should be the soloist at the concert to commemorate this event.

Castaways who chose recordings by Anne Ziegler and/or Webster Booth. Click on the Castaway’s name to listen to the broadcast (if available)

David Croft (writer) 14 March 1993: When
We are Married
 from The Belle of New York (Kerker)


Miriam Rothschild (Conservationist, biologist) 23
April 1989: 



Right Honourable Lord Denning (Master of the Rolls, Politician,
Lawyer) 17 May 1980: 
 Roses of Picardy (Haydn
Wood) With Fred Hartley and his Quintet




Rosina Harrison (Lady Astor’s lady’s maid, writer) 20 March 1976:  BLESS
THIS HOUSE: BRAHE


Noel Streatfeild (Writer) 17 January 1976: The Faery Song from The
Immortal Hour
 (Rutland ghton)


 

Percy Press (Punch and Judy man, puppeteer) 28 December 1974: 

BarryHumphries (Comedian) 24 November
1973: 


Bill Shankly (Manager Liverpool FC, athlete, football manager) 26 April
1965: 

 
Percy Merriman (Musician,
Concert Performer, Roosters Concert Party) 17 August 1964: 
Roses of Picardy (Haydn Wood) With Fred Hartley and his Quintet

Lord George Sanger (Circus, circus proprietor) 22 December
1962: I’ll see you again  from Bitter
Sweet 
(Noel Coward)

Ursula Bloom (Novelist, writer, journalist)
 14 November 1960: 

WEBSTER BOOTH: HOMING (DEL RIEGO)

 

Dr W.E Shewell-Cooper (Horticulturalist) 10 April 1965: Passing by (Purcell)



*Dennis Noble (Baritone) 19 November
1956: The Long Day Closes (Sullivan) by Tommy
Handley Memorial choir, which included Webster Booth


*R.C. Sherriff (Playwright and writer) 23 August
1955: Miserere from Il Trovatore (Verdi) with
Joan Cross, Webster Booth




*Fred Perry (Tennis
player, athlete) 8 July 1952: WEBSTER BOOTH: THE LOST CHORD

 

 


*Leslie Henson (Comedy actor) 18 July
1951: Olive Gilbert, Peter Graves, Webster Booth, Helen Hill

NOVELLO MEDLEY


*Anona Winn (actress and singer) 4 April 1951:MADAM BUTTERFLY: LOVE DUET

There was a break in broadcasting Desert Island Discs between 1946 and 1951


*Signalman Henry Wheeler (soldier, navy signalman) 24 November 1945: If You Were the Only Girl in the World

*Joan Edgar (Light Programme announcer) 1 September 1945: 
MADAM BUTTERFLY: LOVE DUET


*Ralph Reader (Theatre director) 12 February 1944: 
BLESSTHIS HOUSE: BRAHE

*Alan Dent (Drama critic) 8 January 1944:WEBSTER BOOTH: WHERE E’RE YOU WALK
(HANDEL)

                                                                   
Barrington Dalby (Boxing referee, Athlete) 20 August 1942: WEBSTER BOOTH: THE ENGLISH ROSE (GERMAN) 


Nathaniel Gubbins
(Norman Gubbins)
by Howard Coster
half-plate film negative, 1940
NPG x19712
© National Portrait Gallery, London 
Nathaniel Gubbins (Humorous writer) 6 August  1942: The Faery Song from The Immortal Hour by Rutland Boughton

 


*Beatrice Lillie(Actress and revue star) 9 July 1942: The Lord’s Prayer (Malotte)
*Arthur Askey (Comedian) 2 April 1942: Serenade (Schubert)


*Pat Kirkwood (Actress) 

26 February 1942: Serenade (Schubert)

*Desert Island Discs marked with an asterisk do not have podcasts available in the BBC4 Archives search. 

Top of Form

Bottom of Form

Recordings not in my collection
Someone asked me the other day how many Booth-Ziegler recordings I had in my
collection. Rather than count them up, I compiled a list of those which are not
in my collection. If anyone has any of these recordings, I would be delighted
to receive an MP3 of it and will gladly send them an MP3 of one of mine in
exchange. 


Decca F9921
Sanctuary of the Heart/Ketelby; He Bought My Heart At Calvary/Hamblen with
choir of St Stephen’s Church Dulwich, Fela Sowande (organ) June 1952


Test recording
Serenata, Macushla Reginald Paul, C Studio, Small Queens Hall, London, 20
November 1929

Recently acquired: Love Passes By and As I sit here

B8476 I’m all alone/May; I’ll wait for you/ Feiner, September 1936

B9030 When You Wish Upon a Star/Pinocchio/ Harline; Rosita/Kennedy/Carr, 1939

B9271 Will You Go with Me?/Brandon-Park/Murray,Gerald Moore 1942

JG282 Songs our boys sang/National savings sing-song/Sydney Burchall, Clarence Wright, Webster Booth

B9502 All Soul’s Day/ Richard Strauss; Memory Island/ Harrison/ Gerald Moore, September 1946

C2814 Neapolitan Nights, Light Opera Company with Webster Booth

C2827 Memories of Tosti/La Scala Singers with Webster Booth

Ave Maria/Schubert, Ernest Lush (unpublished) – Also recorded on 11 August 1939

Here Comes the Bride Selection/Schwartz/Light Opera Company with Alice Moxon, Stuart
Robertson, Webster Booth, George Baker/Ray Noble/Studio C, Small Queens Hall,
London/Cc18897-4, 25 March 1930 (Number unknown)



 

Bibliography

Collen, J.
(Compiler)
 Webster Booth
and Anne Ziegler: Excerpts from Gramophone and Discography
 MY LULU
STOREFRONT

Plomley, R (with Derek Drescher) Desert
Island Lists
, Hutchinson, 1984


Most of the recordings on clypit.com were restored by Mike Taylor.

Join: The Golden Age of Webster Booth-Anne Ziegler and Friends on Facebook.

 


Jean Collen

Updated: 16 January 2017.



Picture Window
template. Powered by Blogger.
Preview

 

ANNE ZIEGLER (22nd June 1910 – 13th October 2003)

On the occasion of the thirteenth anniversary of the death of Anne Ziegler (Tuesday 13 October 2003) I am posting a picture of her posing as Mrs Siddons in the famous Gainsborough painting. This photograph first appeared in The Star (Johannesburg) in 1962.

Hear Anne singing in Noel Coward Vocal Gems (1947)

 

 

Anne as principal boy in panto.

13 OCTOBER is the anniversary of the death of Anne Ziegler in Penrhyn Bay, Llandudno, North Wales. It seems no time since I received the sad phone call from her friend, Sally Rayner to let me know that Anne had passed away. Anne had a bad fall in her home in Penrhyn Bay, North Wales on 8 August 2003 and spent the last few months of her life in  hospital. She died on 13 October, 2003, at the age of 93.

I am posting this beautiful photograph of Anne dressed in a rose-trimmed crinoline. During Anne’s singing career in the UK in the days of fame and glory during the forties and early fifties, Anne was noted for the beautiful crinolines she wore in the Variety act with her husband, the renowned British tenor, Webster Booth, and in stage and film performances. The gown in this photograph is an excellent example and the roses allude to Anne and Webster’s signature tune, Only a Rose from The Vagabond King. The couple starred in a revival of this Rudolf Friml musical at the Winter Garden Theatre in 1943.

While the generation who remembers Anne and Webster from those far-off days is growing smaller with the passing years, I hope new generations will discover them by listening to their recordings, many of which are available on CD. I have uploaded a number of rare 78 rpm recordings by Anne and Webster on YOU TUBE, and you may listen to these by clicking on the links to the right, or go directly to Duettist’s YouTube channel. Anne did not make many solo recordings, but Webster made recordings of oratorio, opera, ballads, musicals and art songs as well as medleys and duets with other singers as well as numerous duet recordings with Anne.

There is a group on Facebook dedicated to the lives, recordings, photos and careers of Anne and Webster. Many of their 78rpm recordings have been perfectly restored by Mike Taylor, the co-administrator of the group. We have 83 members at present and would welcome anyone who is interested in the couple. Click on the link below to join our group.

The Golden Age of Webster Booth-Anne Ziegler and Friends

Jean Collen – 12th October 2016.

WEBSTER BOOTH – The thirty-second anniversary of his death – 21 January 1902 – 21 June 1984

Today is the thirty-second anniversary of the death of Leslie Webster Booth (21 January 1902 – 21 June 1984). Sadly missed, but always remembered. 

The song on the clyp is: 

Sylvia by Oley Speaks.

Extract from SWEETHEARTS OF SONG: A PERSONAL MEMOIR OF ANNE ZIEGLER AND WEBSTER BOOTH (JEAN COLLEN)

EARLY DAYS IN BIRMINGHAM AND LINCOLN

Leslie Webster Booth was born on 21 January 1902 in a three storey home above his father’s ladies hairdressing business at 157 Soho Road, Handsworth, Birmingham. He was the youngest son of Edwin Booth and his wife Sarah (née Webster) in a family of three sons and three daughters. Edwin was a hairdresser, who had served in the Royal Staffordshire Regiment as a Barber Surgeon. Sarah was from Chilvers Coton, Nuneaton, where her parents and later she and her sister, Hannah, had been handloom silk weavers. Her brother, William Thomas Webster was a partner in Foster and Webster, a successful gentlemen’s outfitters with branches throughout the Midlands. Sarah’s brother eventually left the firm, but it continues to this day under the name of Foster Brothers.

Leslie was the youngest of six children and his eldest sister, Doris, (known as Nellie), played as big a part in his upbringing as his mother. All three sisters doted on their young brother, who, from an early age, possessed a singing voice of outstanding quality. The family held musical evenings at home and delighted in their father’s robust rendition of The Veteran’s Song, while his mother and sisters were moved to tears when young Leslie sang the mournful ballad, Valé in his beautiful treble voice.

At nine years of age Leslie’s voice elevated him from St James’ Church choir in Edwardian Handsworth to the choir stalls of Lincoln Cathedral as a chorister under the direction of Dr George Bennett. Dr Bennett was a fine musician, but a stern taskmaster, who insisted that choristers sang with flat tongues: he was not averse to flattening an errant tongue with his ever-ready broken baton. Just as today’s Cathedral choristers are disciplined hard-working musicians of the highest order, so they were in the first decades of the twentieth century also. Christmas holidays for the choristers commenced only after they had completed the Christmas Eve services to Dr Bennett’s satisfaction.

Lincoln was a good training ground for young Leslie Booth. Although he did not make great progress on the piano and thus did not advance to learning the organ, an instrument he longed to play. The Willis organ at Lincoln Cathedral had been opened in 1898, eleven years before Leslie went to Lincoln, and is still considered as one of the finest organs in England. Leslie did, however, learn to sight-read vocal lines with ease. This ability stood him in good stead as a professional singer, especially at recording sessions.

When he went to HMV studios for a recording session he would be given six to eight songs to record at a time. These he would sight-read and record in one or two takes. After the session the songs would soon be forgotten: a different approach to recording from today’s pop singers who seem to spend months recording their new “album”! Years later, people often appeared before him clutching one of his old records, assuring him of their great attachment to the particular song, but he often had no recollection of making it in the first place.

After his voice broke at the age of thirteen, he returned to the family home in Birmingham to study accountancy at Aston Commercial School. He was set for the steady job of accountant like Uncle Jim, his father’s brother, but at fifteen, when his voice had settled, he began his vocal studies as a tenor with Dr Richard Wassall, the musical director at the Midland Institute in Birmingham. Leslie was an avid supporter of West Bromwich Albion football team and was goalie in the Aston Commercial School team. He was a promising enough goalie to be offered a place with the Aston Villa Colts, but this idea did not meet with his headmaster’s approval. Despite his accountancy studies, he secretly dreamed of the more glamorous callings of football and singing. Luckily for the world, singing eventually won.

With his great natural vocal gifts, his striking good looks and winning personality, performing came easily to him. He sang duets with Uncle Jim’s daughter, his cousin Lily Booth, a promising mezzo soprano, and soon he was also singing at concerts and oratorio performances all over the Midlands and Wales. By this time he was a tall, imposing young man, who realised that appearance and stage presence were nearly as important to a professional singer as an exceptional voice. Although he had perfect diction in song, he felt it necessary to take elocution lessons with the Shakespearian actor Sir Robert Atkins, the founder of the Open Air Theatre at Regents Park, to smooth the Brummy intonation from his speech.

His adult voice was a distinctive lyric tenor, with an exceptionally wide range and a baritonal quality on the lower notes. His diction was clear and lacked the idiosyncratic pronunciation and bleating quality of many of his contemporaries, which marked them as refined English singers, not quite able to compete with their more virile Italian and German counterparts. In my opinion, Heddle Nash and David Lloyd were the only two British tenors of Webster Booth’s generation who had comparable voices.

At twenty-one Leslie auditioned for the D’Oyly Carte Opera Company and was immediately accepted after a London audition. Although he had been doing well in accountancy, he abandoned his job with little regret to become a professional singer, making his debut with the company in The Yeomen of the Guard at the Theatre Royal, Brighton on 9 September 1923. He stayed with the company for four years, but made no great advancement from the chorus and small parts. In Duet, his joint autobiography, with Anne Ziegler, he complained that the only way one could advance in the company was to wait to fill “dead men’s shoes”. Despite this observation, he was one of the few singers allowed to record individual songs from the Gilbert and Sullivan repertoire without the prior approval of the D’Oyly Carte family.

His recordings of Take a pair of sparkling eyes and A Wand’ring Minstrel under the baton of the gifted conductor Leslie Heward, who died tragically young, remain unsurpassed and are now available on CD. He went with the D’Oyly Carte Company on a memorable and successful tour of Canada. Winifred Lawson, the principal soprano, heard him singing Your Tiny Hand is Frozen from La Bohème at the ship’s concert and was deeply impressed with the beauty of his voice. She was not surprised when he left the company soon after its return to England, to eventually become a deserved success in his own right.

In 1924 he had married Winifred Keey, the daughter of Edgar Keey, his headmaster at Aston Commercial School. Winifred borrowed £100 from a relative, with no intention of repaying it, and used the money to follow Leslie to London against her parents’ wishes, or possibly without their knowledge. They might have approved of the match had Leslie remained a respectable accountant like his elder brother, Norman, but they were against her taking up with a chorus boy in the D’Oyly Carte. Her family would have no more to do with her, annoyed at her, partly because of her defiance of their wishes and partly because she had borrowed such a large sum of money under false pretences from a member of the family. Because they disowned her they never knew that she and Leslie had married or that she gave birth to a son and imagined that she and Leslie were living together in sin.

Winifred and Leslie’s son, Keith was born the year after their marriage on 12 June 1925, and his birth was registered in Birmingham North. Leslie was on tour for fifty weeks of the year and Winifred, left alone with her small son, was estranged from her parents although living in the suburb of Moseley in the same city. After several years she suddenly deserted Leslie and his son. He had suspicions that all was not well at home when he came home from a tour with D’Oyly Carte to find Keith sitting by himself on the doorstep. Winifred had left her small son to his own devices while she went dancing.

Leslie searched for Winifred in every town where he was singing, but despite his desperate attempts to trace her, he never found her, and eventually divorced her in 1931, citing Trevor Davey as co-respondent. Leslie was granted custody of Keith, who never saw his mother again after his sixth birthday.

After the stability of a regular – if small – salary from D’Oyly Carte, he was now a freelance performer with a small son to support and no regular money to his name. In the D’Oyly Carte Company he was known as Leslie W. Booth, but now he adopted his middle name, and became Webster Booth on stage, although his family and close friends continued to call him Leslie for the rest of his life.

During this precarious period of his life before he achieved fame and stability in the profession, Webster joined Tom Howell’s Opieros, a concert party with a difference, as some of its members sang operatic excerpts while others were comedians and light entertainers found in the usual concert party. Tom Howell was a baritone from Swansea and he and Webster often sang duets together in the shows. For several years Webster toured all over the country with the Opieros during the summer season, performing on piers and in municipal parks. H Baynton-Power was the Opieros’ excellent accompanist.

In winter Webster sang in cabaret at various large Lyons’ restaurants and cafés, at many Masonic concerts and staff dinners, often with the pianist Gladys Vernon as his accompanist. Gladys Vernon was to marry another well-known tenor, Walter Midgeley.

During the winter seasons of 1927 and 1928 he and Tom Howell appeared in Fred Melville pantomimes at Brixton. The first pantomime in 1927 was St George and the Dragon. St George was played by principal boy, Vera Wright, while Webster played King Arthur. 1928’s pantomime at the Brixton Theatre was a freely adapted version of Babes in the Wood. Once again Vera Wright played principal boy, this time in the role of Robin Hood.

Webster made his West End debut as the Duke of Buckingham in Rudolph Friml’s The Three Musketeers at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane in 1930. The leading role of D’Artagnan was taken by Dennis King, an actor and singer Webster greatly admired for his great energy. Other distinguished cast members were Lilian Davies, Marie Ney, Adrienne Brune and Raymond Newell. Unfortunately Webster could only appear in this show for three months as he had already signed a contract for a Blackpool summer show for Ernest Butcher. Despite Sir Alfred Butt’s best efforts to get him released from this contract, Ernest Butcher would not budge. Webster’s part was taken over by the well-known Yorkshire tenor, Robert Naylor. When Webster set off sadly and reluctantly to fulfill his engagement on the Central Pier, Blackpool, his one consolation was that he could continue singing Queen of My Heart, one of the hits from The Three Musketeers with which he had scored such a success on the West End.

Webster met his second wife, Dorothy Annie Alice Prior (stage name Paddy Prior) in the early nineteen-thirties. He was singing One Alone at a Concert Artistes Association concert and happened to notice her sitting in the audience. Paddy Prior was born in Fulham in 1905, the daughter of Hubert Prior, an ironmonger, and his wife, Annie Jane (née Henderson). Paddy went on the professional stage while still in her teens. She was a light comedienne, dancer, and a soubrette with a charming mezzo soprano voice and appeared on television in its early days in The Ridgeway Revue with Philip Ridgeway and Hermione Gingold. By the time she met Webster she was a veteran of many concert parties, musicals and pantomimes, and always received good reviews for her work. Despite her talent she had periods of unemployment and placed occasional advertisements in The Stage, such as this one in April 1926, which read as follows:

In 1931 Webster divorced Winifred, citing her affair with Trevor Davey and on 10 October 1932 he married Paddy at Fulham Registry Office, where he had married Winifred Keey in 1924. Around the same time Winifred married James L. Haig at the Lambeth Registry Office. Webster and Paddy went to Newquay for their honeymoon.

Webster sang for several seasons in Papa Pinder’s Sunshine concert party at the Sunshine Theatre, Shanklin on the Isle of Wight.

In 1933 he and Paddy appeared together for the summer season in The Piccadilly Revels Concert Party at Scarborough. The following year, Webster managed to arrange for Paddy to obtain an engagement with him in the Sunshine show. Appearing on the same bill with them was Arthur Askey, and he and Webster became great friends. After hearing Webster sing To Anthea by J L Hatton at one of the shows, the Askeys decided to name their baby daughter Anthea…

See more in my bookstore at: JEAN COLLEN’S BOOKSTORE

 

Jean Collen

21 June 2016.

DUET by Webster Booth and Anne Ziegler

https://clyp.it/rbifk0dz/widget

Click on the above link to hear a recording of Webster Booth and Anne Ziegler singing one of their most popular duets, Will You Remember? (Sigmund Romberg)
I have digitised Duet, the autobiography of Webster Booth and Anne Ziegler, published by Stanley Paul in 1951. It is available as a paperback and an epub book at: My Lulu bookstore

db432-2016-03-18_103821

The introduction to the book reads as follows:

England’s most popular duettists, who have sung in Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and America, and are loved by millions of radio fans, have written their love-story together.

The provincial choirboy and the little Liverpool pianist have come a long way. Webster Booth ran away from an accountant’s stool to tour England at £4 a week and sing on the piers. Anne Ziegler’s father was ruined on the cotton market, so she sang in restaurant cabaret. They met playing the lovers in “Faust” – and fell in love. But he was married already.

Concert-party struggles, pantomime rivalries, fun and peril in early films, adventures at Savoy Hill and parts in stage “flops” were followed by great successes. She was hailed as “Radio’s Nightingale”, and as a leading lady in New York and London, a film star and BBC favourite. He sang at the Albert Hall and Covent Garden, starred in the West End and on films and radio. They went half round the world together, singing.

There are two-fisted criticisms and fascinating glimpses behind the scenes in film-land, stage-land and the mad and magic world of music. The authors laugh at themselves, each other and the world as they take you with them – this boy and girl who made good in one of real life’s most moving romances.

The links are as follows:

Paperback:

DUET by Webster Booth and Anne Ziegler

 

E-book (Epub)

DUET by Webster Booth and Anne Ziegler.

John Marwood, a member of The Golden Age of Webster Booth-Anne Ziegler and Friends group on Facebook wrote the following interesting review of the book:

I’ve just read Duet, Anne Ziegler and Webster Booth’s autobiography, published by Stanley Paul & Co. in 1951.

My plan was to read it over several days, but once I’d started, I could not put it down.

In the opening chapter Webster says that ‘Someone must begin even a duet. The die is cast and I am the victim – though, no doubt, the ladies will have the last word!’

The first chapter and all subsequent odd numbers are simply headed ’Webster’; and all the even ones are headed ‘Anne’.

The last chapter of the 25 is headed ‘Webster and Anne’; and so the autobiography ends neatly with a joint effort – a duet.

The remark by Webster about ladies sets the tone. It is light, witty and amusing. There is no chapter without entertaining anecdotes.

Apparently the book was ghost-written by the late Frank S. Stuart [Frank Stanley Stuart]. Frank was adept at presenting amusing tales that were based on factual events. Mention is made of precise events in diaries, so I imagine both characters lent their diaries to the writer and spent many hours relating tales, adventures and anecdotes about the past. The two personae sound entirely plausible.

I was surprised by the strong anti-war remarks in the book; and it seems the ghost-writer was a pacifist. Apparently Webster and Anne were not happy with these remarks, and it seems surprising that the publisher allowed them to remain. Only 6 years after the end of the terrible world conflagration many readers must have felt uncomfortable about some of these remarks.

The book was published 5 years before the couple left for South Africa. It is pity we never get to hear them speaking about their years there, but perhaps 1951 was when they were at the peak of their fame. We read of the couple’s delight to be told that Queen Mary had herself picked out their act as a favourite one which she wished to hear at a Gala Variety to mark her eightieth birthday. We read of other encounters with the royal family.

It is a tale of fun and glamour, tails and crinolines, a most entertaining story – a must-read for everyone who remembers the couple, or for anyone who has just discovered them recently.

John Marwood

I might add that John Marwood proofread the digitised copy most meticulously. I am very grateful to him for his help.

Here is a short review of the book, published in The Age, an Australian newspaper, on 16 February 1952.

16 February 1952 - The New Age

Review of “Duet” (1952)

Review by Fiona Compton: 

By Fiona Compton
May 31, 2016
I read this book many years ago and am delighted that it has been digitised and once again available to those who are interested in reading about the illustrious careers of tenor Webster Booth and soprano Anne Ziegler. Although the book was written by a ghost-writer, the tone of the alternate chapters written in turn by Anne and Webster captures the personalities of both writers – Webster’s writing is more measured and thoughtful than Anne’s enthusiastic, spontaneous writing. Webster Booth had one of the finest British tenor voices of the twentieth century and had a distinguished career in oratorio and recording in his own right. Anne Ziegler had a pleasant light soprano voice and a charming personality, but she was never in the same vocal class as her husband. This book is entitled “Duet”, so the emphasis of the book is on the work the couple did together as duettists on the concert and variety stage. I thoroughly enjoyed the book but I would have liked to have heard more about Webster’s distinguished solo singing career. No doubt this book was responsible for giving people the idea that Webster was merely a romantic duettist in partnership with his wife, doing nothing more than singing light songs together with her. Despite this reservation, the book moves at lightning pace and is most enjoyable. I recommend it highly.

 

 

Jean Collen

5 May 2016.

 

 

 

DuetDuet by Anne Ziegler and Webster Booth
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Webster Booth and Anne Ziegler were my singing teachers in Johannesburg. While I was studying with them I acted as Webster’s studio accompanist when Anne (who usually played the piano for students) had other engagements. We became good friends, a friendship which lasted until they died – Webster in 1984, and Anne in 2003.

I first read “Duet” when Webster brought it into the studio and gave it to me to read. I was fascinated by the lively story of their rise to fame, their romance which was fraught with difficulties because Webster was married to Paddy Prior already, and their popularity as duettists during the forties and early fifties.

This book was written when they were at the height of their fame, some years before they had income tax difficulties and eventually moved to South Africa in 1956. Perhaps it was as well that the book ended before they experienced any hardship.

I have always tried to keep Anne and Webster’s singing and illustrious careers before the public. I am sure that anyone who reads their autobiography will get a good idea of their charming personalities from reading this fascinating book. Several people who have read it recently, have described it as “unputdownable”. I hope whoever reads this review and is tempted to read the book will share that opinion of it!

View all my reviews

WEBSTER BOOTH’S ASSOCIATION WITH THE QUEEN’S HALL.

QUEENS HALL, LANGHAM PLACE
 
 
 
The Queen’s Hall had seventeen entrances in Langham Place, Riding House Street and Great Portland Street and originally seated 3000 people, although, after alterations in 1919, housed only 2,400. It was considered to have excellent acoustics. There was also the Queen’s Small Hall, seating 500 people. This hall opened in November 1893.
 
While Webster Booth always considered this hall to be his favourite as a singer, he was associated with it as early as 1935 when the unusual film written and composed by Friedrich Feher in which he appeared as a troubadour, was first shown in the Queen’s Hall. The film was called The Robber Symphony. Not only was Webster required to pull a piano through the snow in the Alps during the making of this film, but he also sang several songs written by Mr Feher, one in creditable Italian.
 
ROMANCE from THE ROBBER SYMPHONY (FRIEDRICH FEHER)
 
Webster Booth in The Robber Symphony with Magda Sonja
 
 
Webster sang many oratorio performances in the Queen’s Hall, including a Messiah, conducted by Sir Thomas Beecham on 17 December 1938. It was at this performance that Australian, Joan Hammond sang the soprano solos in one of her first engagements in England. At that time Joan Hammond had a beautiful lyrical soprano voice, but after further training Webster was surprised to discover that her voice had become very much heavier when he recorded the duet from Madame Butterfly with her in 1943. In order to balance the duet, Miss Hammond had to stand quite a distance behind Webster during the recording, conducted by the (then) Dr Malcolm
Sargent. 

Australian Soprano, Joan Hammond.

Australian Soprano, Joan Hammond.

 
DUET FROM MADAME BUTTERFLY: JOAN HAMMOND, WEBSTER BOOTH
 
By the time this recording was made, the Queen’s Hall had been destroyed by an incendiary bomb. On the afternoon of 10 May 1941 Webster had sung the part of the Soul in Elgar’s Dream of Gerontius at the Queen’s Hall. The other soloists were contralto, Muriel Brunskill (the Angel)  and baritone, Ronald Stear (The Priest and Angel of Agony). The soloists, the London Philharmonic Orchestra and the Royal Choral Society were conducted by Malcolm Sargent. 
Contralto, Muriel Brunskill

Contralto, Muriel Brunskill

 

Interior of Queen’s Hall
I have always regretted that no recording was ever made of Webster singing Gerontius, as he was notable in this role. When he immigrated to South Africa he sang in the first South African performance of The Dream of Gerontius in 1957, conducted by a very young Keith Jewell, who became the Cape Town City Organist. Keith Jewell accompanied Anne and Webster in (what was meant to be) their farewell concert in Somerset West, Cape Province in 1975..  
 

 

The day in 1941 had been pleasant and sunny, but only a few hours after this performance of  The Dream of Gerontius, the Queen’s Hall was destroyed by a German incendiary bomb. Webster Booth always considered the hall to be the finest concert hall in the
world for a singer. The Promenade Concerts had been held there, but after the destruction of this beautiful hall they transferred to the
Royal Albert Hall. Webster Booth said in his joint autobiography with Anne Ziegler, Duet (1951), that many singers were terrified to
sing in the Albert Hall after the warm acoustic of the Queen’s Hall, but although he adored the Albert Hall, the Queen’s Hall would always remain his favourite London Concert Hall.
 
Jean Collen Revised 23 April 2016 ©
 
Share/Bookmark

Welcome to “The Drawing Room”.

 

 Webster Booth, seated left, Peggy Haddon and Anna Bender (at piano), Gé Korsten and Jean Gluckman (singers), Kathleen Alister (harp) and studio audience.

 

Nearly fifty-four years ago, in April 1962, Webster Booth presented a short series of drawing room concerts on the English Service of the SABC before an invited studio audience. He and
Anne sang solos and duets in several programmes, and a number of guest
artistes took part. Webster also sang duets with bass, Graham Burns.
Among the guest artistes were Doris Brasch and Rita Roberts (sopranos)
Gert Potgieter and Gé Korsten (tenors), Graham Burns (bass) Jean
Gluckman (contralto), Kathleen Allister (harp), Maisie Flinck and Peggy
Haddon (pianos) and Walter Mony (violin). A trumpeter also appeared in
one of the programmes, but I do not remember his name after all this
time. The accompanist was Anna Bender, the official accompanist at the SABC.

 The idea was to create the atmosphere of a polite middle-class Victorian or Edwardian
drawing room concert, where singers and instrumentalists performed their
party pieces such as In a Monastery Garden, The Maiden’s Prayer, O Dry Those Tears and
the like. Sounds of polite conversation and laughter between the items,
with restrained applause for the musical offerings were required, so a
studio audience was invited to provide these “noises off”.

Shortly before this programme started, Webster wrote an article for the SABC Bulletin on
17 March 1962.

A Nostalgic Half-hour of Memories by Webster Booth

“Do you remember those Drawing-room concerts our Grandparents used to hold in the afternoons and evenings way back in the late 1800’s and early 1900’s? There were of course, the Society At Homes. These were rather serious affairs, when artistes of repute were engaged. Such artistes as Ben Davis, Madame Patti, Charles Santley and even Madame Melba were paid huge sums of money to entertain the guests.

However, in this new series, to be called Drawing-Room, we want to concentrate on the homely atmosphere, with those lovely old ballads, such as Parted, Little Grey Home in the West, The Rosary, Tosti’s Goodbye, Friend o’ Mine, A Perfect Day, etc., together with those grand pianoforte solos which were all in the Star Folios, and without which no one was considered a pianist. Items like The Maiden’s Prayer, Destiny Waltz, In a Monastery Garden etc. Then the fiddle solos and fiddle obbligatos, vocal duets such as Watchman, What of the Night? Moonlight and Roses and Battle Eve. I so well remember my father, who was Barber-Surgeon to the Royal Staffordshire Regiment, dressing up in his red and gold uniform and singing The Veteran’s Song, and I would be induced to sing in my treble voice, songs like Valé and The Song of Hope, while my mother and sisters had a wonderful evening crying their eyes out. Those were the days when composers wrote songs for the voice, and singers learned to sing ballads. Believe me, those songs needed singing.  They had a story to tell, usually in three verses, all different tempos, portraying passion, joy and tears, and finishing up on a hefty top note.

We intend to invite a small studio audience to help to catch the atmosphere of the drawing-room, and to have well known South African artistes, both vocal and instrumental, to sing and play to us. This  programme will, I am sure, bring to the older listeners a glorious nostalgic half-hour of memories, and will let the younger generations realise there was real music in the home before the advent of the Cinema, Radio and the gramophone. Do tune in to the English programme at 8.30 pm on Wednesday evenings and join us in our Drawing-room. I shall be in charge of the entertainment and Miss Anna
Bender will be our Hostess at the pianoforte.”

For the first recording, Webster invited pupils and friends to form part of the Drawing Room in one of the smaller recording studios at Broadcasting House, Commissioner Street. I was very excited when he asked if I would like to attend the recording. My great friend and fellow pupil of Anne and Webster’s, Ruth Ormond, and I were there with our parents and we noticed Lucille Ackerman, another pupil,  accompanied by a large family contingent.

2011-08-13_205936AW

Anne Ziegler & Webster Booth (1963)

 

Anne and Webster looked particularly glamorous for the occasion. Anne was wearing a beautiful evening gown, a mink stole – not yet a politically incorrect item of dress  – her fair hair in a chignon, while Webster was in full evening dress, all set to act as compère for the evening and to sing some drawing room ballads into the bargain. The accompanist for the series was Anna Bender, the official accompanist for the SABC. Anne and Webster received their guests graciously. Anne told Ruth and me to save her a seat in the front row, where she sat between us and played her full part in chatting to us between the items on the programme to evoke the atmosphere of a drawing room at the beginning of the twentieth
century.

My dear friend, Ruth Ormond, 1963

Ruth Ormond and me (below).

Photo Album

 I’m afraid that this was not the atmosphere conveyed to those listening in to these broadcasts. The polite studio audience applauded vigorously, suggesting the city hall rather than a drawing room. Fifty-four years later I still remember Miss Rita Roberts (soprano) singing Christina’s Lament to the tune of Dvorak’s Humoresque, Mr Walter Mony (violin), Miss Anna Bender (accompanist) and finally Webster himself, aged sixty and still in fine voice, singing The Kashmiri Song, The Sweetest flower that Blows, Parted, O Dry Those Tears and finally If You Had But Known with violin obbligato by the excellent Mr Mony, a French Canadian, who became a professor and head of the music department at the University of the Witwatersrand.

Ruth and I were entranced to have spent such a happy evening and to see and hear Webster singing only a few feet away from where we were sitting. As we were leaving I told Anne breathlessly that Webster’s singing was wonderful and she replied, “Yes, we’re both very proud of him, aren’t we, darling?” which made me feel rather naïve and childish although I was all of eighteen at the time.

The Drawing Room series was recorded over a number of weeks and we attended another recording when Anne, in a sleeveless black evening dress, sang If No One Ever Marries Me, The Little Damozel and a Handel aria from the opera Xerses, He’ll Say That For My Love. Anne had sung the last song at her Wigmore Hall recital in 1933. Later in that programme she and Webster sang duets together: Drink to Me Only with Thine Eyes and The Second Minuet.

One evening Ruth and I were at a choir practice with the SABC choir and she decided that during our interval, we should go to the Drawing Room studio to say hello to Webster during the break in his recording session. The first programme was not quite finished so we slipped into the studio quietly and listened to Kathleen Alister playing two solos on her harp.

Webster came out of the studio after the recording and appeared delighted to see us and kissed us both in greeting. He asked what we were doing there, and then said, “Oh, of course, you’re working aren’t you? It’s a pity you can’t stay for the next recording to hear the wonderful trumpeter.”

We were both so excited at meeting Webster (not entirely unexpectedly) and being kissed into the bargain, that Ruth walked into the men’s cloakroom instead of the women’s, only to have him politely point her in the right direction. We were both blood red with embarrassment by the time we got back to our seats at our now rather tame choir practice.

I thought Drawing Room was a lovely programme, but the critics had their misgivings about it, saying that the atmosphere created was not quite right, so it was taken off the air after a relatively short time. I once made enquiries at the SABC as to whether any of the programmes existed in their archives, but apparently they had not been kept. I had recorded several programmes via a microphone on my newly-acquired reel-to-reel tape recorder. The sound quality of these recordings is not very good, but when I listen to them all these years later, I am transformed into an excited and optimistic teenager, back in that SABC studio with Ruth and Anne, completely entranced with the music of the Drawing Room.

Sadly, it has occurred to me that most of the people mentioned in this article are now dead and gone, but the memory of that happy time remains vividly in my mind.

Here are links to some of the songs Webster sang on that programme.

Click on the links to hear him.

Friend o’ Mine (Restored by Mike Taylor) https://clyp.it/2hupnyrm

Parted (Tosti) https://clyp.it/qriewsgs

O, Dry Those Tears (del Riego) https://clyp.it/llblyizd

The Sweetest Flower that Blows https://clyp.it/0iftdnlr

Jean Collen –  April 2016

Join: The Golden Age of Webster Booth-Anne Ziegler and Friends on Facebook.

Share/Bookmark

A Scattered Garland: Gleanings from the Lives of Webster Booth and Anne Ziegler – compiled and edited by Jean Collen

         

By Jean Collen View this Author’s Spotlight

I have updated and enlarged my book, A Scattered Garland. It is available in print and as an ebook at Lulu.

I am offering a 10% discount on all my books for a limited period.

 2012-06-24_154311

 

Anne and Webster in a full page advert for Skol beer (1961)                                                                                           Advertising Skol beer in a full-page newspaper advertisement (1961)

The book is a compilation of newspaper snippets, articles and criticisms, taken from a wide variety of sources, interspersed with my own comments expanding on particular events.

Although the book is primarily an informal reference work rather than a story or biography, it shows the progress of Anne and Webster’s careers. It gives an interesting picture of the early career of Webster Booth after he left the D’Oyly Carte Company before he was firmly established on the road to success.

 Author of "A Scattered Garland".

Author of “A Scattered Garland”.

Jean Collen – author and compiler.

Leslie Webster Booth was born on 21 January 1902, the youngest son of Edwin and Sarah Booth (née Webster) of 157 Soho Road, Handsworth, Staffordshire. His father was a ladies’ hairdresser and his mother, born in Chilvers Coton in the Nuneaton district, was the daughter of John and Hannah Webster, silk weavers,who later became school teachers when the silk trade collapsed.

Birthplace of Webster Booth.

Birthplace of Webster Booth.

157 Soho Road, Handsworth as it is today. The family lived in the two upper storeys above the hairdressing shop.

Leslie Webster Booth as a young manWebster Booth as a young man

.













Leslie Webster Booth as a young man in the Buster Keaton film, The Invader.

In the Buster Keaton film, "The Invader" (1934)

In the Buster Keaton film, “The Invader” (1934)

 

Webster Booth's home in 1927. Photo: Mike Collen

Webster Booth’s home in 1927. Photo: Mike Collen

43 Prospect Road, Moseley (Photo: Mike Collen) The home of Webster Booth in 1927.

 

The Opieros before Webster Booth joined them in 1927/

The Opieros before Webster Booth joined them in 1927/

The Opieros with Welsh baritone Tom Howell in the middle of the group. Anita Edwards (soprano) is top right. This photo was taken before Webster Booth joined the Opieros in 1927.

 

Anne Ziegler

Irené Frances Eastwood (Anne Ziegler) was born on 22 June 1910, the youngest child of Ernest and Eliza Frances Eastwood (née Doyle) of 13 Marmion Road, Sefton Park, Liverpool. Her father was a cotton broker, and her mother, born in Bootle, was the daughter of James and Elizabeth Doyle. James was an architect, who designed the Grand Hotel, Llandudno.

Irené’s father lost most of his money during the cotton slump of the early thirties so Irené went to London to find theatrical work to support herself and help her struggling family. She took “Anne Ziegler” as a stage name when she signed a contract to appear in the musical play, By Appointment.

Marmion Road, Sefton Park, Liverpool as it is today.

Anne Ziegler's childhood home in Liverpool

Anne Ziegler’s childhood home in Liverpool

                                                                            Anne Ziegler as a young woman.



The book also lists a variety of engagements of his second wife, Paddy Prior, who went on the stage as a dancer, comedienne and soubrette while still in her teens. When she and Webster married they undertook a number of joint engagements, but these ceased towards the end of 1936 when their marriage broke down because of his relationship with Anne Ziegler.

Paddy Prior and Webster Booth in 1933 - Scarborough

Paddy Prior and Webster Booth in 1933 – Scarborough

Paddy Prior and Webster Booth (1933)

Stage advert (1920s)

Stage advert (1920s)

Webster and Anne went on to attain international fame, while Paddy’s career remained static. She was a competent and talented performer and was rarely out of work, but she did not progress beyond after-dinner engagements, musicals, pantomime, concert party and occasional radio and television broadcasts.


Webster was not eligible for military service during the war. He and Anne reached the height of their fame during the war on the Variety Circuit and in several lavish musicals and films, while Paddy worked for ENSA and entertained at home and in the Middle East. She and her friend, Bettie Bucknelle left for Australia in 1948. Paddy’s brother Hubert had settled in Sydney, so presumably she went to Australia to join him. Although Bettie Bucknelle sang on Australian radio and was a regular vocalist with Jay Wilbur’s band, I have been unable to find any details of Paddy Prior’s work in Australia.


The compilation covers Anne and Webster’s musical and theatrical ventures from Webster’s first professional engagement with D’Oyly Carte in the early nineteen-twenties to Anne’s final broadcast towards the end of the century. The book is over 400 pages in length and is liberally illustrated.

Compiled and edited by Jean Collen

Compiled and edited by Jean Collen

 Buy a print copy of the book for £14.00 (less 10% discount) at the following link: Print copy:  A Scattered Garland

Support independent publishing: Buy this book on Lulu.

EBook version of this book.

EBook version of this book.

Download the EBook for £6.00 at the following link:

EBook copy of A Scattered Garland

 

Good Reads Book Reviews

The Moon And SixpenceThe Moon And Sixpence by W. Somerset Maugham
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Apparently Strickland was based on the artist Paul Gauguin, but if this was the case, there is a very loose connection between the two for this in not a novel a clef. The book held my interest while the narrator had personal contact with Strickland and his wife. Almost from the beginning of the novel, before Charles Strickland had appeared, I thought him a thoroughly reprehensible character.

Admittedly his wife was not an imaginative woman and used her established position in society to cultivate the society of writers and artists although she appeared to be devoid of any artistic talent herself. She obviously regarded her "dull" husband as nothing more than a meal-ticket and she had never encouraged his artistic inclinations. It is only after he leaves her to her own devices that she manages to pull herself together, fend for herself and look after her children without being dependent on a man any longer.

The portrait of a completely self-centred, inarticulate Strickland, who does not care about the opinion of others was well-drawn but after the narrator is no longer in personal contact with Strickland and the rest of the story of Strickland's life is related to him by a third person the story is less satisfactory. I have to admit that I did not finish the last fifty pages of the book. Although I like Maugham's work, this was not my favourite Maugham novel.

View all my reviews

Daily Motion Videos

Errol Collen (translator)

Blogs I Follow

themarcistagenda

my creative adventure

notewords

handwork, writing, life, music, books

Semi-Partisan Politics

A semi-biased commentary on British and American politics, culture and current affairs

Music Hall Alice

All things Music Hall...

Glasgow Dog Training By Dog Behaviourist John McGuigan

Promoting non aversive dog training & puppy training classes

Post a Book

We post stories. You enjoy them.

FIONA COMPTON'S FICTION

This blog has been created to promote Fiona Compton's fiction. All her books are available at: http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/fiona_compton

Footlight Notes

Celebrities of popular entertainment, 1850s - 1920s

britishmusichallsociety

Just another WordPress.com site

TIME

Current & Breaking News | National & World Updates

Save our iMfolozi Wilderness

HELP SAVE the iMfolozi Wilderness Area by saying NO to the Fuleni Coal Mine and YES to keeping Wilderness Areas sacred.

Johannesburg 1912 - Suburb by suburb research

"What is fashionable now is despised by the next generation, thought quaint by the following and revered by the one thereafter"

Slipped Disc

Norman Lebrecht on shifting sound worlds

WAR HISTORY ONLINE

THE PLACE FOR MILITARY HISTORY NEWS AND VIEWS

My Grilling Life - Jani Allan

Sautéing and Satire. Blue Jasmine story about someone who was a household name in South Africa who becomes a waitress in New Jersey.

Marc Latilla

"The best thing is surprising people, knowing that tomorrow it will all be forgotten" Regine Zylberberg

helencareybooks

A site for readers and writers

Bowlly Radio

Writer, Editor, Proof-reader, Musician

Edwardian Promenade

Your #1 source for Edwardian history!

Lisa's History Room

where the past is always present

%d bloggers like this: